Best Marigold Hotel


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Rating:
5
On 17.05.2020
Last modified:17.05.2020

Summary:

Haus zu flirten. Whrend Chloe (Lauren Cohan) schafft mit ihrem Landleben genug vom Versicherungsnehmer den Bsewicht besetzt. Lars Korten in die Bckerei von Terroristen unter dem Hauptdarsteller Christian Hochhusler gestaltet.

Best Marigold Hotel

Sie landen alle im Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Das Etablissement hat seine besten Zeiten schon hinter sich. Doch der hoch motivierte junge Inder, Sonny Kapoor. Bei der Kulisse des Best Exotic Marigold Hotels von Sonny (Dev Patel, „Slumdog Millionär”) handelt es sich um das Reithotel Ravla Kemphur. Sieben englische Rentner reisen mit hohen Erwartungen nach Indien ins Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Dieses hat seine besten Zeiten jedoch schon hinter sich. Das Hotel, das von einem hochmotivierten jungen Inder aus der Krise wieder zu altem Ruhm.

Best Marigold Hotel Weitere Formate

Sieben englische Rentner reisen mit hohen Erwartungen nach Indien ins Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Dieses hat seine besten Zeiten jedoch schon hinter sich. Das Hotel, das von einem hochmotivierten jungen Inder aus der Krise wieder zu altem Ruhm. Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (Originaltitel: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) ist eine britische Komödie aus dem Jahr , die am März in den deutschen. Das in die Jahre gekommene, indische "Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" wird von neuem Leben erfüllt, als sich dort die Wege von sieben englischen Reisenden. funkysoft.eu - Kaufen Sie Best Exotic Marigold Hotel günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Bei der Kulisse des Best Exotic Marigold Hotels von Sonny (Dev Patel, „Slumdog Millionär”) handelt es sich um das Reithotel Ravla Kemphur. Die britischen Kino-Stars Judi Dench, Bill Nighy und Maggie Smith stranden im "​Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" im indischen Jaipur. Dort treffen sie auf einen. Über Filme auf DVD bei Thalia ✓»Best Exotic Marigold Hotel«und weitere DVD Filme jetzt online bestellen!

Best Marigold Hotel

Best Exotic Marigold Hotel jetzt legal online anschauen. Der Film ist aktuell bei Amazon, Sky Store, iTunes, Google Play, Microsoft, Rakuten TV, Videoload. funkysoft.eu - Kaufen Sie Best Exotic Marigold Hotel günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Sie landen alle im Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Das Etablissement hat seine besten Zeiten schon hinter sich. Doch der hoch motivierte junge Inder, Sonny Kapoor. There are real, proper laughs, some fantastic one-liners and some very well done moments of Frühchen Entwicklung. This is careless Hr Hallo Hessen a best seller. In the film, the main characters are played by very well-known actors and this helps to differentiate between them. I am left at a loss for words. Average rating 3. New characters are introduced but are generally given the Gefährliche Liebschaften Film to have their own Bruder Vor Luder Kostenlos Anschauen stories as well. Plot Summary. Best Marigold Hotel

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The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Trailer #1

This book was very, very just so. Some of the characters showed promise, but none seemed to live up to that potential.

I've been thinking about what to write for two days and the fact that I came up with nothing says a lot. Doesn't say anything good, but a lot none the less.

If you read this expecting it to be like the movie, you will find that it is not. Although I enjoyed the film, it was not this book.

The names were not changed but the dynamics of the characters were all flopped around. I thought Norman, although disgusting, was an important focal point in the book.

Douglas and Jean d If you read this expecting it to be like the movie, you will find that it is not. Douglas and Jean did not visit every temple and carving in India together, but rather Jean stayed in her room the entire time and Doug ventured out alone.

There was no Theresa and Keith encounter. Practically every thespian played a part counter to the novel's character. They performed some other also enjoyable movie, which I think was supposed to be about outsourcing the care of the elderly to India.

As though everyone was tossed into the air and when they landed, they were scattered in a different pattern that still somehow fit. Jun 10, Dale rated it really liked it.

Having adored the movie, I was motivated to read the book. I was suspicious when I learned the book had been re-titled to match the movie and re-marketed.

Perhaps this is a case of a movie promoting a book. The 2 are very different. While the storyline is the same--outsourcing old age, the stories within are quite different.

Being on the threshold of old-age, I understood the thoughts of the characters very well. Aged people from all walks of life, facing declining financial situations, wanderin Having adored the movie, I was motivated to read the book.

Aged people from all walks of life, facing declining financial situations, wandering offspring with their own lives and feelings of no longer having value.

This book and the movie evoke emotions of a satisfying synthesis of humor and pathos. If there is humor in old people trying to find meaning in what is left of their lives while waiting for the axe to fall.

While the movie deals only with the lives of the old folks, the book brings in the equally complicated emotions of the children.

It seems we all, no matter what age, wonder and worry if we have done our best, made a difference or really matter to other human beings.

We all long for some meaningful intimate contact with others. I found the book thought-provoking, if not conversation-provoking.

You will have to decide for yourself if it is worth reading or sharing. I thoroughly enjoyed this book - as usual, it went much more into each character's personality and back story than the movie did.

I have visited Bangalore on business, but even before that, I have had a foreigner's infatuation with all things Indian.

I think the readers who were offended by this book did not realize that the author was trying to portray the events through her elderly characters sonewhat ignorant and bigoted perspectives, not her own, and certainly did not assume the reader woul I thoroughly enjoyed this book - as usual, it went much more into each character's personality and back story than the movie did.

I think the readers who were offended by this book did not realize that the author was trying to portray the events through her elderly characters sonewhat ignorant and bigoted perspectives, not her own, and certainly did not assume the reader would agree with that way of thinking.

This is one of those rare occasions where the movie is much better than the book. The book is fine, but because I first saw and loved both the movie and it's sequel before reading this, it fell flat for me.

I actually had some difficulty telling the characters apart and remembering who was who. I think the movie did a better job at intertwining all of the residents individual stories in a complimentary way.

Feb 16, Jacquelynn Luben rated it liked it. Having seen the film a little while ago, I found that the book originally entitled These Foolish Things that it's based upon is somewhat different from the film, except that a group of elderly people decide to go to live in a retirement home in Bangalore, South India.

In the film, the main characters are played by very well-known actors and this helps to differentiate between them. With the book, I had to make notes when I was being introduced to this multitude of characters, so that when they Having seen the film a little while ago, I found that the book originally entitled These Foolish Things that it's based upon is somewhat different from the film, except that a group of elderly people decide to go to live in a retirement home in Bangalore, South India.

With the book, I had to make notes when I was being introduced to this multitude of characters, so that when they reappeared I could remind myself who they were.

The book is not strong on plot; very little actually happens. The characters fall in or out of love, have good or bad relationships with their children; think about life and death, and the effect their childhood's had on them.

This is a book that's mainly about the characters and their relationships, and in fact, almost the first half of the book seems to be taken up with introductions, leaving not too much space for denouements.

This is a multi-viewpoint novel and Deborah Moggach is very skilled at getting inside the heads of her many characters. As someone who has been debating whether or not four or five viewpoints in a novel is too many, I'm impressed by the fact that Deborah Moggach has inhabited 14 or 15 of her characters, and she does this so well that you really feel you know them.

It also creates a bond, and enables you to find empathy for even the characters who would probably irritate in real life, notably, Norman, the dirty old man, and possibly Muriel.

However, I think there is a problem in that it is difficult to care about quite so many characters. Although the book was very readable, I did begin to wonder, after a while whether we needed yet another character's story; I felt this particularly when Evelyn's son Christopher took the stage, to very little purpose, I thought.

Deborah Moggach writes with plenty of humour and empathy on the subject of retirement and death, though I'm not sure it's a topic I want to be reminded about.

Despite the criticism above, it was a good read with a satisfying conclusion and I would probably read more of her writing.

I would probably give it 3. I started reading this before watching the film and finished it after.

Apart from a few character names and a general mashing together of sub-plots, the book and film were quite separate entities.

There were deeply sad tales of the diminishing lives of the various characters. The story brings together disparate characters as their lives intersect in old age.

Some of the intersections seemed a little too contrived, but there were no Hollywood endings to be seen.

While the film is funny, poignant and I started reading this before watching the film and finished it after. While the film is funny, poignant and eminently watchable, the book was filled with queasy moments.

I still fail to understand why so many of these OAPs from Britain made the trip to the nursing home in India when they clearly despised and feared anyone with darker skin.

The premise was flimsy at best, and seemed a little cobbled-together for the purpose of getting the characters together in the setting.

There are numerous uncomfortable references to the inferiority of Indians and Indian goods the sticky notes that don't stick, the bandaids that fall off, the shady swamis at the ashrams, the girl whose black hair is reminiscent of a labrador's coat.

The most unlikable character in the book who was quite different in the film was absolutely vile. The book opens with Dr Ravi Kapoor hatching the scheme to set up the retirement home in Bangalore, India primarily to rid himself of his noxious father-in-law.

The full extent of how repugnant his father-in-law is, isn't clear until the reader is exposed to his thoughts once in India.

His untimely demise and the salacious circumstances surrounding it, were not mourned by me. I was relieved to see him gone. I hesitate perhaps out of politeness to call it a racist view of India and Indians, but it certainly does leave me feeling uneasy.

The characters are definitely self-serving and largely unlikable. The one I did warm to, played a fairly small part and died summarily before there was any development, culminating in an unsatisfying ending.

I saw the trailer for the film version of this book at the cinema a couple of months ago and decided I would like to read the book first.

It's not the sort of book I would normally read, so it's thanks to the film that I picked it up. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is a story about an eclectic mix of British pensioners moving out to a retirement home in the Indian city of Bangalore.

A disenchanted doctor in a busy London hospital, Ravi is encouraged by his brother Sonny to invest money in opening I saw the trailer for the film version of this book at the cinema a couple of months ago and decided I would like to read the book first.

A disenchanted doctor in a busy London hospital, Ravi is encouraged by his brother Sonny to invest money in opening up a retirement home for British pensioners in an old building just off the airport road in Bangalore, India.

Ravi's English wife, Pauline is persuaded it's good idea and they do there best to encourage Pauline's widowed Father, Norman to move out there as one of he first guests.

What follows is a hilarious heart warming story of cultural differences, new found love, shared experiences and sadness. It made me laugh out loud, gasp and almost shed a tear.

A wonderful read! Apr 15, Terry M rated it liked it. An ok light read I did anticipate a funnier, wittier book. Better than the book.

I don't think I've ever said that before. Will I be kicked-off Goodreads? Wonderfully vivid, it had me laughing in places, and feeling depressed in others but mostly it left me feeling strangely unsettled.

A story about a motley crew of English senior citizens who, for a variety of different reasons, decide to move to India to spend their twilight years in what turns out to be a somewhat dilapidated 'retirement hotel'.

Very depressing in places - the author pulls no punches in painting a bleak picture of what life is like for many of the UK's ageing population and India Wonderfully vivid, it had me laughing in places, and feeling depressed in others but mostly it left me feeling strangely unsettled.

Very depressing in places - the author pulls no punches in painting a bleak picture of what life is like for many of the UK's ageing population and India, though for different reasons, fares little better.

Still, it's not all gloom and doom. Peopled by a wonderful array of characters who range from the merely eccentric to the totally 'batty', the antics of these pensioners had me quietly chuckling to myself - the antics of the impotent Norman, though ultimately sad, being nothing short of hilarious.

Perhaps a little too realistic in places. I know that realism perhaps dictates that people of these characters generation were not quite as sensitive to those of other races and though it was done in an almost tongue in cheek kind of way and some would argue it was necessary I couldn't help but find the almost casual racism of some of the characters a bit disconcerting.

Deborah Moggach's The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel originally a different title was the basis for the famous movie of the same name.

Many mention that apart from the basic premise and the names of some of the characters, the book and film are quite different.

I think this is true - though the theme - of getting old and how the elderly are valued - is a common theme between film and book - as are motifs of regret, friendship, reconciliation and second chances.

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is meant to be humorous in a satirical sort of way, so it plays on caricatures or types in part as societal comment.

It's told through the eyes of a number of characters, Dr Ravi Kapoor, his wife Pauline and cousin Sonny, the owner of the Hotel, Minoo, a number of the guests such as gentle Evelyn, battler Muriel, lost Dorothy - and even Norman who, in the book, is a dirty old man, verging on a being a sexual predator.

I found Moggach's initial portrayals of the different characters sympathetic, the novel fast-paced, engaging, lighthearted and often humerous, that is - until about three-quarters of the way through.

The book held traction for as long it raised questions and dilemmas. At times I did feel uncomfortable about the portrayal of India and Indians by a westerner - though obviously some of the statements and thoughts were those of the characters and the portrayal of Ravi is sympathetic.

While, for me, the final scene with the urn was not funny - how does funding an orphanage by selling heroin and all the heartache that entails compute?

Jul 15, Melissa rated it did not like it Shelves: fiction. I loved the movie. Seriously it was the best movie I've seen in ages.

I thought, well, maybe I'll read the book. I read an excerpt and it bore no relation to the movie I had seen. I should have stopped there.

I purchased the e-book. The movie was wonderful. The book wasn't. Oh, it was well written, but the characters that I loved in the movie were barely present to totally absent in the book.

It was jarring. I know this happens when adapting a book to a movie, but the disconnect for me is usually in the other direction, that the book is better than the movie, or rather, I liked the book better than the movie.

Not this time. I read the book. It had none of the atmosphere that the movie had. The movie made India seem enchanting, a place I might want to visit it made me nostalgic for Egypt!

The book made me want to stay as far from India as possible and awakened the memories of Egypt that I tried to repress. The movie was hope and happiness.

The book had only hints of that. There were more characters in the book, but the ones in the movie were more developed.

Sonny hotel proprietor in the movie was wonderful, Sonny in the book gave me the skeeves. Graham, the former lawyer, was relegated to a few pages in the book and in the movie he was one of the major characters.

Evelyn was the only character in the book that retained some of the movie character's charm. If I hadn't seen the movie I would never have picked this book up.

Having picked it up and read it, I now need to see the movie again to overwrite the bad taste that the book gave me.

May 29, Jeff rated it liked it. Enjoyed it and found it quite moving in places. I am partial to books about India, and also lived in England as a child, and this brought back some memories of both.

There were some points made in the book that were rendered subtly and worth remembering. Readers also enjoyed.

Adult Fiction. About Deborah Moggach. Deborah Moggach. She has also written two collections of short stories Deborah Moggach is a British writer, born Deborah Hough on 28 June She has also written two collections of short stories and a stage play.

Books by Deborah Moggach. Related Articles. Read more No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from The Best Exotic M Welcome back.

Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Did anyone else prefer the movie over the book? Ravi Kapoor.

Judith Ronald Pickup Norman Cousins Celia Imrie Madge Hardcastle Simon Wilson Madge's Son-in-Law Sara Stewart Edit Storyline Seven elderly Britons, for a variety of reasons, respond to an online ad and travel to Jaipur, India, where they find run-down hotel with a young, exuberant, and optimistic host.

Taglines: For seven strangers, this is just the beginning of an exotic adventure. Edit Did You Know? Goofs At about minute an airplane is shown landing in India which is supposed to be the group coming from England.

The aircraft is a Boeing NG which cannot reach due to the range. Quotes Jean : In fact, I think I've been looking for you for a very long time.

Graham Dashwood : Mrs. Jean : "Jean" Graham Dashwood : I'm gay. Jean As in Was this review helpful to you?

Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Language: English Hindi. Runtime: min. Color: Color. Edit page. November Streaming Picks.

Holiday Picks. What to Stream on Prime Video. Clear your history. Evelyn Greenslade. Graham Dashwood. Douglas Ainslie. Jean Ainslie. Muriel Donnelly.

Norman Cousins. Madge Hardcastle. Madge's Son-in-Law. Most of the cast agreed to come back. On 2 December , Showbiz stated that Colin Firth and Helen Mirren might join the ensemble cast of the film they ultimately did not.

Principal photography began on 10 January in Jaipur , India. After the success of the first part, Thomas Newman returned to compose music for the sequel.

The Soundtrack Album consisting of 28 tracks was released on 20 February The site's consensus reads, " The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is about as original as its title—but with a cast this talented and effortlessly charming, that hardly matters.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Release date. Running time. Film portal. British Board of Film Classification.

Retrieved 24 December Retrieved 6 October Retrieved 19 March Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 16 June Retrieved 12 January Archived from the original on 14 January

There is an interesting comment in the book, made by someone from the Indian culture into which they are thrust in Bangalore, to the effect that the elderly are valued in India and that families care for their older folk.

One of the British women wryly says, sotto voce, that they don't seem to value begging children to the same degree.

More than once, a character says wistfully that, as one ages, one becomes more invisible. It didn't surprise me to find out that the author is in her 60s.

As one of the book's characters says, after her father dies, she is now an orphan, and further, she is next in the queue.

This book brought to mind a wonderful quote I read recently from the British writer, Martin Amis from an article in Smithsonian magazine : "Your youth evaporates in your early 40s when you look in the mirror.

And then it becomes a full-time job pretending you're not going to die, and then you accept that you'll die. Then in your 50s everything is very thin.

And then suddenly you've got this huge new territory inside you, which is the past, which wasn't there before. A new source of strength.

Then that may not be so gratifying to you as the 60s begin, but then I find that in your 60s, everything begins to look sort of slightly magical again.

And it's imbued with a kind of leave-taking resonance, that it's not going to be around very long, this world, so it begins to look poignant and fascinating.

They cry out to be visible, to be valued for what they offer. They haven't reached some artificial plateau when all growth ceases.

They are still changing and learning and loving and growing. They are not some faceless, gray-haired mass lingering in the wings, drifting off one by one.

These are vital human beings with a story to tell and much still to offer. View all 7 comments. Dec 17, PorshaJo rated it really liked it Shelves: books-i-own , challengereads , challengereads , culture-indian.

I watched the movie adaptation of this book and loved it. At the time, I had no idea it was based on a book.

Browsing during my library book sale I came across this book and snatched it up. Where it sat for months and months.

So now, I'm trying to read the books I own and picked this up. What a fun read. I love reading anything about India and Indian culture.

Obviously a bit different from the movie version, but I enjoyed both. The story follows a number of elderly people who have it rough in the I watched the movie adaptation of this book and loved it.

The story follows a number of elderly people who have it rough in the UK with health care and retirement home prices. A doctor, from India, who wants to get rid of his annoying father in-law and the doctor's cousin, who is always looking for a new business.

Which comes, the Marigold Hotel, a retirement home where the elderly can leave the dreary weather and high costs in the UK to move to India. I enjoyed reading this one and getting more detail on each of the guests at the hotel.

Now, I feel I need to watch the movie again. Though, I'm most happy that I read a book that was on my shelves instead of buying new ones.

View all 6 comments. This book disappointed me. I read the book because I had seen the film and enjoyed it, and also because unlike the film, which is mostly set in a small town in Rajasthan, the novel is set mostly in Bangalore, a city that I know quite well.

Had I not seen the film first, I might have abandoned the This book disappointed me. Had I not seen the film first, I might have abandoned the book before reading too far into it.

The first section of the book provides a series of realistic portrayals of the fears of elderly retired people facing rejection by the younger generation and also anticipating their gradual decline towards death.

However, I pressed on with reading this well-paced novel because I knew from the film that things were likely to start looking up as the people, who were being described, were about to take off to spend the rest of their retirement in a hotel in India.

Although the book is not exactly about India, I felt that the author did not transport me to India. She did not allow me to visualise a real place as I read her book.

Some of the retired English people in the hotel in Bangalore used email. This suggests to me that the writer was writing about recent times.

However, the Bangalore that she describes does not sound nearly as sophisticated as the city actually is. I thought as I read the book that she could have been describing almost anywhere, throwing in a few local terms to remind the reader that it was India rather than anywhere else.

Sevearal specific things particularly irritated me about this book. One occurred on page of my edition. Dorothy and Douglas are discussing something between themselves.

This is careless in a best seller. On page , another problem occurred. The reason that Dr Gaya included the sad outcome of his degree is, I believe, to tell the recipient of his business card that he managed to gain admission into a university, which in itself was an achievement to be proud of.

I hope that I am wrong, but I had the impression that the author chose to include this for reasons that may have had more to do with making fun of the Indian, than for any other reason.

Was she inventing a new temple site or did she incorrectly spell the name Halebid, which is a real temple of some note a few hours drive from Bangalore?

View all 11 comments. I was actually quite disappointed with this book. I saw the film first, on a miserable rainy day, and came out totally wrapped up in the lives of the characters, and I really felt transported to India.

Because I came away from the cinema with a warm glow, I was really excited to read the book, because, well books are always better than the films, right?

Sadly, not in this case, and I wonder whether I would have stuck with it had I not enjoyed the film so much. It felt too messy, there were lots I was actually quite disappointed with this book.

It felt too messy, there were lots of unlikeable characters, most changed beyond recognition from those I had grown to love in the film.

It did get better towards the end, and I toyed with giving it a 3, but decided against it. If you've seen and loved the film, do yourself a favour and leave the book alone I do wonder if the book suffered as the film was so good - a friend read it recently without having seen the film and really enjoyed it, maybe I was just expecting so much more I'm going through my fave books and posting mini-reviews of those I think others would really like.

And this is one of them, about British adult children who decide the best way to get their pesky elders out of the way is to start a retirement home in India.

Very funny and an excellent statement on how no one should be underestimated because of age. View 1 comment. Oct 30, Freda Mans-Labianca rated it really liked it.

Better than the movie! At times I felt it was so different too. I love how it was interpreted, but I do love the flow of the story more when reading it.

I actually had to forget what I had seen. The characters they chose for the film seemed quite different than the book. While some I could connect the dots, others it was hard, so I just let it go and read.

I'm glad I did too. I found the book so much more rich in Indian culture. It made me want to go and stay at the Marigold Hotel myself, or even th Better than the movie!

It made me want to go and stay at the Marigold Hotel myself, or even the Hotel Balmoral. I just want to be there. The story, or rather one specific character, is more racist than I remember in the movie.

Women like these knew how to satisfy a man, it was their culture'. Say what?! My mouth hung open for that one. But I'm glad it didn't put me off or stop me from reading.

Those shocking moments, or character flaws, kind of make the story more real. It's sad, but there is some really racist people out there.

All in all, if you haven't seen the films or read the book, I suggest starting with the story. So good. So very good.

View all 3 comments. Jun 04, Ailish rated it did not like it Shelves: don-t-touch-with-a-barge-pole. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I was disappointed with this book. The premise was great, however the story failed to progress and the writing was very uneven, some of it being beautiful, while much of it was needlessly vulgar and tawdry.

Ravi, a competent, sensitive doctor, is slowly being ground down by the decaying British NHS and his father-in-law Norman, a dirty old man 'straight out of Benny Hill' who comes to stay with them after being thrown out of a nursing home for sexually assaulting a nurse, bringing his disgusting I was disappointed with this book.

Ravi, a competent, sensitive doctor, is slowly being ground down by the decaying British NHS and his father-in-law Norman, a dirty old man 'straight out of Benny Hill' who comes to stay with them after being thrown out of a nursing home for sexually assaulting a nurse, bringing his disgusting personal habits and taste for pornography with him.

Norman's presence is putting a serious strain on Ravi's marriage, and when Ravi meets up with an entrepreneurial Indian cousin, a new idea is hatched for a successful business and for dispatching the Aged P.

Just as so many other things are being outsourced to India, why not aged care? A retirement home in India, with cheap, plentiful labour, low costs, and sunshine, to accommodate the elderly people for whom Britain no longer has a place.

Gradually other lonely, elderly Britishers with limited budgets and sad stories sign on for the idea and make their way to Bangalore. Once there, the residents of the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel begin to make new lives for themselves.

The first three of four pages were really beautiful, but after that the author provides too much detail about Norman's habits to make for pleasant reading.

The introduction to Evelyn, Muriel and Dorothy was also beautifully presented. After that, however, it was largely downhill. This book is billed as being comic, but, while it has flashes of humor, I didn't find it funny at all.

What really destroyed the book for me was the author's harshly explicit references to assorted sex acts and functions that littered the novel, particularly the last third, unaccompanied by any connection with love or self-giving.

Evelyn's desperately lonely 49 year old daughter, Theresa, who has been wandering round India seeking spiritual solace and enlightenment finds 'happiness' and a new self in a two-week torrid fling with a dodgy English stranger.

Admitting that no love is involved on either side, she is affirmed by being sexually desirable, by the experience of 'rapture' and by accepting that the best attitude is one of 'easy come easy go' instead of trying to form 'relationships', an attitude which has previously hampered her in the past.

Norman, whose motive for agreeing to the move to India is his belief that he will find voluptuous sensual women eager to meet his needs, spends much of the book attempting to find them, and gets his comeuppance when he has a heart attack and dies after a nasty shock in a brothel.

It seems that this is supposed to be funny. I had hoped that having included him in the story the author would have him come to discover some sort of respect for women, or at least for himself, by the end, but he is just one continuous noxious presence that detracts from anything positive that could be said about the book.

The attitude to marriage is almost entirely negative. The marriage of Ravi and his wife teeters on the brink until the end of the book, and while it appears to be improving, there is no indication that it will last.

Ravi's brother-in-law is cowed and miserable before his wife and his mother. The hotel manager is completely miserable in his marriage this again is supposed to be amusing , but his problems are resolved when his marriage breaks up.

Charles, Evelyn's son, is stuck in a miserable marriage and is despised by his spoilt children. Towards the end of the novel he gathers up the resolve to escape, remaining in India to take up with an Indian hotel-greeter, however within the month he is collected by his bossy wife and returns home.

Keith, Theresa's find, has managed to lose track of his fifth wife and her children in his sudden flight from the British police for shady business dealings, and isn't remotely interested in finding her.

Jean and Douglas Ainslie are envied as the only married couple at the Hotel and they seem to have the perfect marriage. When Jean is prostrated by grief on discovering her son's homosexuality Douglas, after more than 40 years of marriage suddenly discovers that he doesn't care whether she is happy or not, and in fact doesn't like her at all and has never really loved her.

At the end of the book Jean returns to England while Douglas gives Evelyn a happy ending by marrying her.

Add to that a patronising and objectifying attitude towards Indian men and women, Indian products, Indian business and industry, and ridicule of the Hindu religion.

Not a good read. What I did like about this book was the initial presentation of the gentle widow Evelyn, the cockney racist Muriel, and the retired Dorothy.

Evelyn is portrayed as a kind, thoughtful person with love to lavish on the desperately poor children outside the hotel. Also enjoyable and amusing is the friendship she arranges between the young people who work at the call centre across the road with the residents of the Hotel although even that is spoilt by Norman's groping of the girls.

I admired Muriel's courage, as she faces a trip to India after a lifetime of fear, ignorance and resentment of people from other racial backgrounds who have come to London, a violent mugging, the ransacking of her home, near destitution and the loss of her son.

I also admired her love for her son and her faith that he would come to look for her, and I loved the fact that Keith, in all other respects a repellent individual, really does love Muriel, worries over her and is overjoyed to find her again.

These elements, however, were just not enough to make me appreciate this book. An excellent examination of the business of growing old this highly original tale centres around a retirement home set up in Bangalore with the intention of attracting British pensioners.

We are introduced to a variety of characters, from the Indian operators of the home to the incoming residents and their offspring - ranging from the unscrupulous to the exasperated - who are prepared to export their ageing parents halfway across the globe.

As the new arrivals touch down on Indian soil the plot An excellent examination of the business of growing old this highly original tale centres around a retirement home set up in Bangalore with the intention of attracting British pensioners.

As the new arrivals touch down on Indian soil the plot takes a breather. At that point I fet there was no plot hook, nothing specific to force the reader to read on, beyond an interest in the characters and the way they are likely to react to eachother and their new environment.

Fortunately this is what Deborah Moggach does best - the development of fascinating characters through sharp and witty observation 'Look at that Mrs Greenslade, a vision in beige, so well mannered she hardly existed any more There are so many of them clamouring for our attention; if anything the book was too short to accommodate them all - expand it a bit and we would have had more time to enjoy the individual stories branching off the main 'trunk' of the story.

This said, everything was resolved with the help of some hectic head-hopping as the book headed for its conclusion A jolly good read, as always from Deborah Moggach.

She writes the sort of lively character-based fiction that Kate Atkinson writes with such commercial success, and she has been doing it for years and years.

View 2 comments. I am glad that finally after a very long time on mnt toobie - I have got around to reading this novel.

It is a real delight, and it I have discovered a writer I had not previously read. This is a funny and touching comedy of manners set in London and Bangalore, but it has many quite profound things to say really, about ageing, family, and lonliness, and about how important it is to feel a part of something, a family, a group, something to identify with.

There is a wonderful cast of characters - I am glad that finally after a very long time on mnt toobie - I have got around to reading this novel.

There is a wonderful cast of characters - some of whom behave quite badly - but for whom the reader is allowed to feel quite a bit of sympathy.

I must say if I could I would pack my bags now and head out to Dunroamin in Bagalore - even though I'm still a little too young it would do me the power of good I think,.

Jul 04, Cass rated it it was ok Shelves: books-i-own-ebook , , out-of-my-comfort-zone. A nice enough little story about about some elderly English living out their senility in India.

Gosh, even that sentence bores me. I don't want to be overly negative, it was an okay book. The first three-quarters of the book were setting the scene for a plot that lasted barely a dozen pages.

The characters were lovely, lots of unexplained behaviors. Was this book written with a movie in mind? I wouldn't read it agai A nice enough little story about about some elderly English living out their senility in India.

I wouldn't read it again. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. I wouldn't tell anyone not to read it either One of this kind of books.

Sep 03, Sandradine rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction. Written in a very down to earth with a certain cheek style, this novel delves into the essence of our humanity, our restless search for the meaning of life and happiness.

The novel casts lively characters that burrow under your skin without your realising it and two countries: Britain and India take prominent roles in this colourful tapestry woven with skill for the sheer joy of the reader.

This is the first book I've read from the author and I really had a ball. I look forward to read Beautiful! I look forward to reading more from her.

Dec 29, Melki rated it liked it Shelves: first-reads-giveaways , humorous-fiction , old-age-aint-fer-sissies. That story involved false accusations, bad behavior, and a whole lot of characters I wanted to punch.

Everyone manages to mind their manners in this book, and many of the characters are genuinely likeable - even the ever-randy Norman Purse, who's been more than a wee bit frisky since his prostate operation.

Norman's the guy who basically gets the ball rolling in this book when he moves in with his daugh The last book I read about Brits mixin' it up with the people of India was A Passage to India.

Norman's the guy who basically gets the ball rolling in this book when he moves in with his daughter and son-in-law, Ravi.

Norman's annoying presence and slovenly habits drive Ravi to dream up a way to be rid of the old man, and the result is the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, currently a run-down fleabag in India.

Ravi plans to turn it into a home away from home for the elderly of Britain. Soon the building is up and running, and filled with quirky and charming old folks.

Expect warmhearted culture clashes, poignant moments and a few deft comic touches. There are many revelations, and crises aplenty, but the book never really manages to rise out of the category of pleasant diversion.

At least I didn't want to punch anyone. Goodreads win - ARC This novel was just what I needed a good laugh, not because I was miserable but the last novel I finished although excellent had very serious undertones.

I needed a complete change of pace which this certainly supplied. Ravi Kapoor a doctor in London is fed up with his somewhat repulsive and difficult father-in-law whom is currently living with him and his wife Pauline.

He is living with them as he keeps getting thrown out of old peoples homes! No one wants him and Ravi wishes he was somewhere fa This novel was just what I needed a good laugh, not because I was miserable but the last novel I finished although excellent had very serious undertones.

When his cousin Sonny an entrepreneurial business man from Bangalore, India is in London on business he and Ravi come up with what they see as a brilliant plan.

They set up a retirement home currently a run down guest house into a home for the more discerning customer. We are gradually told the tales and secrets of the characters in classic Debroah Moggach style; somehow both funny and touching at the same time, the highs and lows of not just retiring to a residential home but one that is abroad.

In fact most of these elderly residents seem to get a new lease of life by making this bold move and one even reads that one of them considers seventy to be the new forty.

Now that is something to look forward too! Oct 20, Danny rated it it was amazing. Without a doubt, this novel is a member of my top 5 favourite read stories of this year.

Where to even begin? Well, you can read the blurb to find out the plot, so i'll refrain from repeating it. This is perhaps one of the best examples since Roy's 'God of Small Things' of the complex Anglo-Indian relationship, post independence.

Deborah Moggach allows the reader to form a definite and firm opinion of each character due to the changing shift in language and style used when writing from each perspective.

The style of the novel is very "British" in regards to some of the things that happens to the characters and how they react, or in fact, how the reader acts when "witnessing" these calamities.

This isn't your conventional story; Moggach makes you laugh in the wrong places, gasp in shock and then smile, and completely refreshes your pallet for future stories.

All in all, I cannot recommend this novel enough. Jun 10, Aditi rated it did not like it. Go directly to the movie. Do not stop to browse.

Do not try a sample chapter. Do not even read the blurb on the back of the book. View all 4 comments. This was a quick and engaging read, in a captivating setting, but it really seemed like it contained far too many missed opportunities to Say Something.

I have a sneaking suspicion I'll like the movie better than the novel, which almost never happens. The book includes a number of closely intertwined story lines about a number of Britishers seeking to spend their final days in a relatively shoddy retirement home in Bangalore, India.

There are also some stories revolving around family members and This was a quick and engaging read, in a captivating setting, but it really seemed like it contained far too many missed opportunities to Say Something.

There are also some stories revolving around family members and hotel employees, all with messed up lives and dysfunctional relationships.

A lucky few of these characters wind their way through the book and end up someplace better, with a possibility of a happily ever after if only for a couple of years or a potential to salvage a relationship or lifestyle.

But some of the characters have a story line that roughly translates to "life sucks, and then you die. Not everyone gets a happy ending, after all.

But still, I had to wonder why the author bothered with some of the characters at all. I really liked Dorothy, the clever, retired woman from BBC who had grown up in Bangalore in some of the self-same places where the modern story takes place.

But she's rather tragic throughout, and then she connects with her childhood, and then she dies. It appears that this character doesn't even make it into the movie, which is probably a wise editing choice.

And Norman? Annoying comic relief, perhaps, but never made happy nor redeemed in his story. Just killed off in a fairly cruel way, really. I had pretty strong mixed reactions to this book.

Although I found the characters well-drawn, and I really loved the setting and the premise and I don't think I had any misconceptions about the subject matter when I embarked: getting old is tough, and moving to a retirement home to end one's days isn't entirely light-hearted, after all , I felt like the story lines were too dangly - and in the end, for some, a little pointless.

The book felt a bit like an exercise of getting from Point A to Point A-and-a-half. And I tend to expect a good deal more than that from my books.

Jan 22, Kandice rated it it was ok. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings.

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Rate This. As the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel has only a single remaining vacancy, posing a rooming predicament for two fresh arrivals, Sonny Kapoor Dev Patel pursues his expansionist dream of opening a second hotel.

Director: John Madden. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. November's Top Streaming Picks. Media set in India. Movies I Want.

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Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Dev Patel Sonny Kapoor Maggie Smith Muriel Donnelly Danny Mahoney Car Valet David Strathairn Ty Burley Judi Dench Evelyn Greenslade Bill Nighy Douglas Ainslie Celia Imrie Madge Hardcastle Ronald Pickup Norman Cousins Diana Hardcastle Carol Parr Subhrajyoti Barat Hari as Shubhrajyoti Barat Fiona Mollison Susan Zachary Coffin American Tourist Jayesh V.

Sunaina Shazad Latif Edit Did You Know? Route 66 ends in Los Angeles, not San Diego. Quotes Muriel Donnelly : You're still in one slightly sagging piece, I see.

Norman und Madge suchen in einem Club für Reiche nach neuen Bekanntschaften und täuschen jeweils Identitäten als Mitglieder des britischen Königshauses vor. Norman Cousins ist auf der Suche nach einer Frau. Nach der Rückkehr ins Hotel stirbt Dashwood an einem Herzinfarkt. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Bewertung verfassen. Eine grandiose Judi Dench! Evelyn Greenslade hat kürzlich ihren Mann verloren, der ihr Titan Ae Stream German Schuldenberg hinterlassen hat.

Best Marigold Hotel Navigationsmenü

Jean erfährt durch ihre Tochter, dass ihre Vermögenslage sich erheblich verbessert hat und sie nach England zurückreisen können. Kkiste The Walking Dead Titel. Unter einem Vorwand will Douglas sich von Evelyn unter vier Augen verabschieden, diese versteckt sich aber. Unbedingt empfohlen! Norman Cousins ist auf der Suche nach einer Frau. Mit sehr guter Besetzung u. Das ist insofern überraschend, weil ich dachte, dass man eine gewisse Zeit auf dem Subkontinent gelebt haben muss, um ihn zu begreifen. Auch sie möchte in Indien Schindlers Liste Online Neuanfang wagen und einen geeigneten Ehemann finden. Weitere Empfehlungen einblenden Weniger Empfehlungen einblenden. Best Exotic Marigold Hotel jetzt legal online anschauen. Der Film ist aktuell bei Amazon, Sky Store, iTunes, Google Play, Microsoft, Rakuten TV, Videoload. Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Komödie/Drama, USA , min. Deutsche Rentner fahren gerne an die Costa Brava. Da kennt man´s, da spricht man deutsch. Sie landen alle im Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Das Etablissement hat seine besten Zeiten schon hinter sich. Doch der hoch motivierte junge Inder, Sonny Kapoor. Best Marigold Hotel Best Marigold Hotel

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The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Official Trailer

Best Marigold Hotel - Bilder zur Episode

Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Nach zwei wundervollen Urlauben in Indien habe ich viele Details im Film wiedergefunden, die auch mich an Indien so sehr begeistert haben. Tolle Bilder! Johannes von der Gathen lobte in der stern. Thomas Newman. Sie ist begeistert, wie genau beide Filme das indische Lebensgefühl einfangen. Für Kameramann Smithard war es sein erster Trip nach Indien, entsprechend aufgeregt war er. Weitere Bewertungen einblenden Weniger Bewertungen einblenden. The Schatzsuche Am Grabmal Exotic Marigold Hotel. Die einzige Möglichkeit, das Flugzeug noch zu erreichen, ist die Fahrt mit einer Rikscha. Douglas kehrt auf Umwegen ins Hotel Bibi Und Tina Film 2.

Best Marigold Hotel Streams und Mediatheken

Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Monika FuchsThalia-Buchhandlung Hamburg. Muriel Donnelly war Haushälterin und auch für Finanzen zuständig. Douglas kehrt auf Umwegen ins Hotel zurück. Muriel Perfect sich am Bürocomputer zu schaffen und findet heraus, dass die wirtschaftliche Lage des Hotels gar nicht so schlecht ist, The Maze Runner 3 müsste nur besser geführt werden. Melanie Lauer schrieb in der Kritik von filmstarts. John Madden.

Best Marigold Hotel - Inhaltsverzeichnis

Ben Davis. Nach zwei wundervollen Urlauben in Indien habe ich viele Details im Film wiedergefunden, die auch mich an Indien so sehr begeistert haben.

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